Leaders Make Tough Choices

Author: sethskim  |  Category: Values

 
Obama and Warren.jpg
AP Photo
 
 
 
I enjoy seeing leadership principles being lived out a daily basis. I am constantly seeing how various situations and even news-worthy events show leadership principles in action. This is why I decide to write on the recent news about President-elect Obama choosing Pastor Rick Warren to give the invocation at the inaugural.

At first glance, there seems to be nothing wrong with this selection because after all, Warren was selected as one of the top 25 Most Influential Evangelical in America by Time Magazine. But context changes everything.

With the recent passing of California’s Proposition 8, the selection of Warren has the gay community up in arms. To select a pastor, who has the largest church “in California” where the Proposition 8 was passed was a clear signal to the gay community as a betrayal.

But this is where principle and politics collide. It has been clear that Obama shares the faith of Warren albeit, there are some issues where they do not completely agree on. But over the months, they have developed a good friendship.

Therefore the challenge for Obama is whether he will put politics over friendship. Some would argue that his pick of Warren was a shrewd political move. But however you want to dissect it, one thing is clear – this is not a popular decision.

It is not just with the gay community, but I am a bit shocked at the responses from the “right-wing” community. They are furious that Warren would even accept the invitation from a person who believes in abortions and other moral issues that do not align with the conservative right-wing worldview.

Can we please everyone?

Are we supposed to please everyone?

However you interpret Obama’s move of having Warren give the invocation, all I can say is that Obama is displaying a good trait of a good leader, which is making tough decision that is not always popular. History tells us that good leaders have always made decisions that do not please everyone. This is one of the reasons why leaders sometimes feel all alone, but it comes with the ballgame.

I have been trying to teach my kids that good leadership takes courage – and courage is “not the absence of fear, but in spite of the fear we learn to obey.”

You can read the story here.

Father Jonathan Morris, a Fox News Religion Contributor gives a good perspective on this issue. Read it here.