Some Observations about Twitter

Author: sethskim  |  Category: Values, Viewpoint

twitter-whale
Photo by Twitter
 
 
I don’t know how many of you are fans of Twitter, but it is taking the social network by storm. I have a feeling that it might supersede Facebook one day – kind of like what Facebook did to Xanga… if you are still using Xanga, I really don’t know what to say.

Now that I have offended some people (Xanga users), there are some observations that I made regarding Twitter just recently:

1) Is it me or is Facebook trying to look more like Twitter? It is often said that imitation is the highest form of compliment. People do not copy unless there is some value in the product.

2) Christina and I have a theory (I repeat, it is just a theory) – guys are more likely to use Twitter, while women prefer Facebook. I think it is partly because Twitter limits you to only 140 characters. Whatever you have to communicate has to be short and sweet. Guys usually just state the facts, while women get into all the details (yes, I know… this is a generalization). Christina was at one of the kids’ school function and she had a conversation with another women in the room. They were talking about how their husbands were frustrated at the number of hours that their wives spend on Facebook. Hence the difference – guys are like, “just give me the bottom line (a la Twitter)” while the gals are like, “let me give you all the details of my life via video, pictures, updates, growing gifts, etc. (a la Facebook).”

3) If you have ever seen the above picture, it is just another reminder of the Twitter phenomenon. Sometimes it is frustrating to see this picture especially when you are trying to do a quick post or trying to look up something. This is a fresh reminder that in all that we do, we always have to be ready for growth. How many churches and organizations fail in productivity and effectiveness because they do not plan for growth?

4) We have to be ahead of the curve. There are innovators and early adopters who start up movements. But then there are people who are the late adopters or people who just refuse to jump on the train. These people are almost always behind the curve. Believe it not, what seems like a new Twitter phenomenon, it is slowly going to be replaced with something else – some would say the innovators and early adopters are on to something else. There are many people who are the late adopters (to an idea or movement) but once they adopt the idea, it is already on its way out; therefore it is out-dated when they join. This is how so much of the Church has been run. I pray that there will be more innovators in the Church, as well as early adopters who will lead the way, even in the secular world. This will be a catalyst for transformation.